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Investigation of Particle Deposition in Internal Cooling Cavities of a Nozzle Guide Vane

2013, Doctor of Philosophy, Ohio State University, Aero/Astro Engineering.
Experimental and computational studies were conducted regarding particle deposition in the internal film cooling cavities of nozzle guide vanes. An experimental facility was fabricated to simulate particle deposition on an impingement liner and upstream surface of a nozzle guide vane wall. The facility supplied particle-laden flow at temperatures up to 1000°F (540°C) to a simplified impingement cooling test section. The heated flow passed through a perforated impingement plate and impacted on a heated flat wall. The particle-laden impingement jets resulted in the buildup of deposit cones associated with individual impingement jets. The deposit growth rate increased with increasing temperature and decreasing impinging velocities. For some low flow rates or high flow temperatures, the deposit cones heights spanned the entire gap between the impingement plate and wall, and grew through the impingement holes. For high flow rates, deposit structures were removed by shear forces from the flow. At low temperatures, deposit formed not only as individual cones, but as ridges located at the mid-planes between impinging jets.
A computational model was developed to predict the deposit buildup seen in the experiments. The test section geometry and fluid flow from the experiment were replicated computationally and an Eulerian-Lagrangian particle tracking technique was employed. Several particle sticking models were employed and tested for adequacy. Sticking models that accurately predicted locations and rates in external deposition experiments failed to predict certain structures or rates seen in internal applications. A geometry adaptation technique was employed and the effect on deposition prediction was discussed.
A new computational sticking model was developed that predicts deposition rates based on the local wall shear. The growth patterns were compared to experiments under different operating conditions. Of all the sticking models employed, the model based on wall shear, in conjunction with geometry adaptation, proved to be the most accurate in predicting the forms of deposit growth. It was the only model that predicted the changing deposition trends based on flow temperature or Reynolds number, and is recommended for further investigation and application in the modeling of deposition in internal cooling cavities.
Jeffrey Bons (Advisor)
Ali Ameri (Committee Member)
Michael Dunn (Committee Member)
Datta Gaitonde (Committee Member)
Sandip Mazumder (Committee Member)
163 p.

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Casaday, B. (2013). Investigation of Particle Deposition in Internal Cooling Cavities of a Nozzle Guide Vane. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Casaday, Brian. "Investigation of Particle Deposition in Internal Cooling Cavities of a Nozzle Guide Vane." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2013. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 18 Dec 2017.

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Casaday, Brian "Investigation of Particle Deposition in Internal Cooling Cavities of a Nozzle Guide Vane." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2013. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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