Search ETDs:
Communication Protocols on the PIC24EP and Arduino - A Tutorial for Undergraduate Students
Chintapalli, Srikar

2017, MS, University of Cincinnati, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Engineering.
With embedded systems technology growing rapidly, communication between MCUs, SOCs, FPGAs, and their peripherals has become extremely crucial to the building of successful applications. The ability for designers to connect and network modules from different manufacturers is what allows the embedded computing world to continue to thrive and overcome roadblocks, driving us further and further towards pervasive and ubiquitous computing. This ability has long been afforded by standardized communication protocols developed and incorporated into the devices we use on a day-to-day basis.

This thesis aims to explain to an undergraduate audience and to implement the major communication protocols that are used to exchange data between microcontrollers and their peripheral modules. With a thorough understanding of these concepts, students should be able to interface and program their microcontroller units to successfully build projects, giving them hands on experience in embedded design. This is an important skill to have in a field in which configuring the electronics and hardware to work correctly is equally as integral as writing code for the desired application. The protocols that are discussed are the three main serial communication protocols: I2C (inter-integrated circuit), SPI (serial peripheral interface), and TTL UART (universal asynchronous receiver transmitter). BLE (Bluetooth low energy) is also explored to try and help students add cheap wireless functionality to their designs. In order to successfully put forth and apply the concepts, this thesis uses the Arduino Uno R3 (Atmel ATmega328 microcontroller) and the mikromedia for PIC24EP (PIC24EP512GU810 microcontroller) boards. On the Arduino, we use high level functions afforded by library support to go through the steps of implementing and using the UART, SPI, and I2C serial communication protocols. For the PIC, we write our own functions to write the protocols from
scratch using registers in the hardware communication modules provided on board. To test these out, we use the BME280 and MCP9808 sensors that can be interfaced with I2C or SPI. In addition, we also go through the steps of using the Bluefruit LE shield by Adafruit to integrate multiple modules adding Bluetooth connectivity to the embedded controller. Based on the tutorial nature of this thesis, students should be able to implement these protocols and interface their own controllers to sensors and modules regardless of manufacturer or library support (given the operating voltages are compatible). At the end of this thesis, there will be a set of exercises to test procedural knowledge and to enable students to assess how well they retained the information.
Carla Purdy, Ph.D. (Committee Chair)
Rui Dai, Ph.D. (Committee Member)
Wen-Ben Jone, Ph.D. (Committee Member)
115 p.

Recommended Citations

Hide/Show APA Citation

Chintapalli, S. (2017). Communication Protocols on the PIC24EP and Arduino - A Tutorial for Undergraduate Students. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Hide/Show MLA Citation

Chintapalli, Srikar. "Communication Protocols on the PIC24EP and Arduino - A Tutorial for Undergraduate Students." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Cincinnati, 2017. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 23 May 2018.

Hide/Show Chicago Citation

Chintapalli, Srikar "Communication Protocols on the PIC24EP and Arduino - A Tutorial for Undergraduate Students." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Cincinnati, 2017. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Files

27853.pdf (4.39 MB) View|Download