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The Impact of Intrusive Dynamic Feedback Interventions on Simulation-based Training Effectiveness
Wilson, Chantale

2017, Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, Psychology-Industrial/Organizational.
Simulation and gaming have become ubiquitous in training curricula, especially in support of military operations. These capabilities provide low-cost, low-risk pedagogical opportunities, and game and simulation-based training (SBT) offer high-fidelity, adaptable and relevant learning experiences for more effective and enduring training. Feedback, and specifically real-time feedback, is a learning tool that can enhance SBT outcomes by giving trainees immediate, personalized performance information and guidance to trainees. This study examined the use of dynamic, real-time visual feedback displays on SBT effectiveness in a military training environment. Three different feedback schedules were introduced as novel feedback interventions in a custom-built SBT teaching novice pilots to fly a generic fighter aircraft. The faded condition contained high-intrusion feedback in the first training block, followed by medium-intrusion feedback in the second block and low-intrusion feedback in the final block. The increasing condition contained the opposite schedule, with low-intrusion feedback in the first training block, medium-intrusion feedback in the second block and high-intrusion feedback in the last block. The static condition contained both low and medium-intrusion feedback throughout training. These schedules were compared against a control condition containing no real-time feedback. The self-concordance model, driven by self-determination theory, led to the prediction that a social factor (real-time feedback
and faded feedback, in particular) would predict competence and autonomy need satisfaction in trainees. This would enhance trainees’ goal self-concordance which would lead to stronger SBT outcomes of higher performance, knowledge acquisition, transfer, and more positive feedback reactions than having no real-time feedback. Results indicated that overall, real-time feedback interventions produced stronger performance outcomes throughout the training period than the control condition. However, there were ultimately no significant feedback group differences on knowledge acquisition, benchmark performance and transfer; thus, the full motivation model was not supported. Nonetheless, the mediated relationship from competence and autonomy need satisfaction to feedback reactions via goal self-concordance was significant throughout the training and transfer blocks. Partial support for the goal self-concordance model and statistically-significant improvement in training for real-time feedback interventions versus the control condition suggest that real-time feedback can positively impact learning during training. This study has implications for when and how real-time feedback should be presented to enhance SBT efficacy.
Joelle Elicker, Dr. (Advisor)
Steven Ash, Dr. (Committee Member)
James Diefendorff, Dr. (Committee Member)
Dennis Doverspike, Dr. (Committee Member)
Paul Levy, Dr. (Committee Member)
264 p.

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Wilson, C. (2017). The Impact of Intrusive Dynamic Feedback Interventions on Simulation-based Training Effectiveness. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Wilson, Chantale. "The Impact of Intrusive Dynamic Feedback Interventions on Simulation-based Training Effectiveness." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Akron, 2017. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 10 Dec 2017.

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Wilson, Chantale "The Impact of Intrusive Dynamic Feedback Interventions on Simulation-based Training Effectiveness." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Akron, 2017. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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