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A Wearable Real-Time and Non-Invasive Thoracic Cavity Monitoring System
Salman, Safa

2015, Doctor of Philosophy, Ohio State University, Electrical and Computer Engineering.
A surgery-free on-body monitoring system is proposed to evaluate the dielectric constant of internal body tissues (especially lung and heart) and effectively determine irregularities in real-time. The proposed surgery-free on-body monitoring system includes a sensor, a post-processing technique, and an automated data collection circuit. Data are automatically collected from the sensor electrodes and then post processed to extract the electrical properties of the underlying biological tissue(s). To demonstrate the imaging concept, planar and wrap-around sensors are devised. These sensors are designed to detect changes in the dielectric constant of inner tissues (lung and heart). The planar sensor focuses on a single organ while the wrap-around sensors allows for imaging of the thoracic cavity’s cross section.
Moreover, post-processing techniques are proposed to complement sensors for a more complete on-body monitoring system. The idea behind the post-processing technique is to suppress interference from the outer layers (skin, fat, muscle, and bone). The sensors and post-processing techniques yield high signal (from the inner layers) to noise (from the outer layers) ratio.
Additionally, data collection circuits are proposed for a more robust and stand-alone system. The circuit design aims to sequentially activate each port of the sensor and portions of the propagating signal are to be received at all passive ports in the form of a voltage at the probes. The voltages are converted to scattering parameters which are then used in the post-processing technique to obtain ¿r. The concept of wearability is also considered through the use of electrically conductive fibers (E-fibers). These fibers show matching performance to that of copper, especially at low frequencies making them a viable substitute.
For the cases considered, the proposed sensors show promising results in recovering the permittivity of deep tissues with a maximum error of 13.5%. These sensors provide a way for a new class of medical sensors through accuracy improvements and avoidance of inverse scattering techniques.
John Volakis, Dr. (Advisor)
Fernando Teixeira, Dr. (Committee Member)
Bradley Clymer, Dr. (Committee Member)
119 p.

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Salman, S. (2015). A Wearable Real-Time and Non-Invasive Thoracic Cavity Monitoring System. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Salman, Safa. "A Wearable Real-Time and Non-Invasive Thoracic Cavity Monitoring System." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2015. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 23 Nov 2017.

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Salman, Safa "A Wearable Real-Time and Non-Invasive Thoracic Cavity Monitoring System." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2015. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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