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Conceiving the nation: literature and nation building in Renaissance France and Post-Quiet Revolution Quebec
Boudreau, Douglas L.

1999, Doctor of Philosophy, Ohio State University, French and Italian.
Previous studies, especially in the field of French-Canadian literature, have indicated the presence of certain traits within French-Canadian literature that recall the literature of Renaissance France. What has been left largely unexplored is why these two cultures, widely separated in time and space, should demonstrate these traits in common. The present study proposes to examine this question, positing the socio-cultural context of nation-building in Renaissance France and post-Quiet Revolution Quebec as a possible basis for these resonances.
Six authors have been selected, three from each period, and this study demonstrates first, the presence of what may be loosely referred to as the "national question" in their works and second, the comparability of these texts by examining their treatment of themes allied to nation-building and nationalism. The works of Michel de Montaigne and Jacques Godbout are examined for their exploration of the national identity as a marginal identity. Noting the prominence of women's writing in both Renaissance France and post-Quiet Revolution Quebec and the affinity between women's identity politics and national identity politics, we have selected four women authors to show how nation-building affects the work of the woman writer and interacts with her treatment of women's identity. Marguerite de Navarre and Anne Hebert are studied for their treatment of the social roles of women, especially family roles, and also for their treatment of personal history. An assessment is made of the role played by these forces in identity. Louise Labe and Nicole Brossard demonstrate in their work the strong presence of desire as a factor in both national and gender identity.
During the course of the examination of these texts, we observe the prominence of images of movement and the presence of biological and especially sexual imagery in the treatment of nation, identity and writing. The study concludes by noting that these six authors are taking advantage of the instability produced in and by their cultural contexts. The destabilization of the old order is exploited as a window of opportunity for social and personal exploration and expansion.
Danielle Marx-Scouras, Professor (Advisor)
Robert Cottrell, Professor (Advisor)
Eugene Holland, Professor (Committee Member)
238 p.

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Boudreau, D. (1999). Conceiving the nation: literature and nation building in Renaissance France and Post-Quiet Revolution Quebec. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Boudreau, Douglas. "Conceiving the nation: literature and nation building in Renaissance France and Post-Quiet Revolution Quebec." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 1999. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 19 Nov 2018.

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Boudreau, Douglas "Conceiving the nation: literature and nation building in Renaissance France and Post-Quiet Revolution Quebec." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 1999. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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