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The Influence of Female Movement in Response to Male Aggression in a Coercive Mating System
Bokides, Dessa A.

2011, Master of Science, Ohio State University, Mathematics.
In many non-monogamous systems males invest less in progeny than do females. This leaves males with a higher potential of reproduction, and a likelihood of sexual conflict. In some systems, males coerce females to copulate when denied matings. If coercive matings are costly, the best female strategy may be to avoid male interaction. In this paper we present a model that demonstrates female movement in response to male aggression as a mechanism to lower costs associated with male coercion, and the effect that female movement has on selection for male aggression. We found that female movement may result in selection for higher or lower aggression levels. Which of these outcomes results depends on the relationship between the aggressiveness of male types in the population and optimal male aggressiveness. Female dispersal away from costly interactions with males creates population structure, which has influences on behavioral evolution. Because females are likely to leave high aggression environments and remain in low or intermediate aggression environments positive assortment is likely to develop in some coercive species.
Yuan Lou (Advisor)
Ian Hamilton (Committee Chair)
28 p.

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Bokides, D. (2011). The Influence of Female Movement in Response to Male Aggression in a Coercive Mating System. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Bokides, Dessa. "The Influence of Female Movement in Response to Male Aggression in a Coercive Mating System." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2011. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 25 Sep 2017.

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Bokides, Dessa "The Influence of Female Movement in Response to Male Aggression in a Coercive Mating System." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2011. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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