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Empire and education: Filipino schooling under United States rule, 1900-1910
Coloma, Roland Sintos

2004, Doctor of Philosophy, Ohio State University, Educational Policy and Leadership.
This dissertation is a history of United States imperialism and Filipino education in the early twentieth century. It is bounded by a time period beginning in 1900 with the establishment of public education in the Philippines, a territory that the U.S. acquired along with Cuba and Puerto Rico at the end of the Spanish-American War. It culminates with the return to the islands in 1910 of Camilo Osias (1889-1976), an American-trained Filipino educator who helped transform his country’s school and political systems. Grounded in postcolonial and ethnic studies, a combined framework that examines the transnational oppression and resistance of colonized peoples of color, this study analyzes the themes of interconnection, identity and agency. Methodologically, data was collected through archival research in universities, government agencies, and public and private libraries in the United States and the Philippines. Michel Foucault’s analytical method of archaeology facilitated the close reading of primary sources, such as government reports, educational materials, newspapers, and the personal papers of American and Filipino teachers. Based on the data, research findings also shed light on the discourses of gender, race, and nationalism as well as the educational aspects of policy, teacher training, and pedagogy. The study offers three central claims: (a) the United States marshaled education as a tool to civilize, modernize and pacify Filipinos; (b) American imperialism was shaped by the transnational elaboration of gendered and racialized orders in which male educators dominated the colonial structure while African American schooling served as the template to instruct subjugated people; and (c) Filipinos enacted a hybrid form of nationalism which brought together western and native influences to subversively employ colonial education and fight for national liberation. The implications of the dissertation are: (a) this research challenges the pervasive American view of the United States as benign and altruistic as well as the disavowal of U.S. imperialist violence and complicity; (b) it disrupts the separate narrations of American and Philippine histories and foregrounds issues of gender, race and nationalism in studies of globalization; and lastly, (c) it points out the contradictions in education as a mechanism for subordination and empowerment.
Patricia Lather (Advisor)
179 p.

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Coloma, R. (2004). Empire and education: Filipino schooling under United States rule, 1900-1910. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Coloma, Roland. "Empire and education: Filipino schooling under United States rule, 1900-1910." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2004. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 23 Oct 2017.

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Coloma, Roland "Empire and education: Filipino schooling under United States rule, 1900-1910." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2004. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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