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Karl Barth, Missions to the Jews, and the American Response
Gaskill, Stephanie Rebekah

2010, Master of Arts (MA), Bowling Green State University, History.
The Christian mission to the Jews has always been one of the most contentious elements in Jewish-Christian relations, and remains so today. Though they differed greatly from coercive efforts to convert the Jews (such as those of knights during the First Crusade in 1095), modern missionary societies established in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were still resented by many Jews. But while individual Christian thinkers voiced doubts about their validity long before, it was not until after the Holocaust, and especially after the Vatican II Council of 1965, that missions to the Jews came to be seriously questioned by a large number of Christian theologians. Most notably, such theologians began to reconsider supersessionism, or the long-held notion that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ and had thus been replaced as God’s people by the Christian church. While theologians from other nations were also involved in this process, the reevaluation of missions to the Jews took place primarily in Germany and America. Though there are many crucial points of contact between these two parallel efforts to reevaluation the relationship between Christians and Jews, one of the intriguing is the work of Karl Barth. Barth’s influence in regards to this reevaluation can be most effectively seen through an examination his impact on four American theologians often noted for their exceptional efforts to improve Jewish-Christian relations in the post-Holocaust world: Reinhold Niebuhr, A. Roy Eckardt, Franklin Littell, and Paul van Buren. The manner in which each theologian reacted to Barth’s position on missions to the Jews not only confirms existing paradigms about the way in which different generations of American theologians received Barth, but also provides opportunities for today’s pluralistic pioneers to effectively engage with the theology of both Barth and the theologians who reacted to him.
Beth Griech-Polelle, PhD (Committee Chair)
Don Rowney, PhD (Committee Member)
124 p.

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Gaskill, S. (2010). Karl Barth, Missions to the Jews, and the American Response. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Gaskill, Stephanie. "Karl Barth, Missions to the Jews, and the American Response." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2010. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 17 Oct 2017.

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Gaskill, Stephanie "Karl Barth, Missions to the Jews, and the American Response." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2010. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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