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A Comparison Between Counselors Who Practice Meditation and Those Who Do Not on Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Self-Compassion

2009, Doctor of Philosophy, University of Akron, Counselor Education and Supervision.
One hundred sixty-four professional counselors completed an on-line survey that included the PRO-QOL (Professional Quality of Life Scale) and the SCS (Self-Compassion Scale). Participants also completed a demographic questionnaire that included length of meditation practice and other self-care practices. Results of a MANCOVA revealed that the meditation practice group (N=62) reported significantly higher levels self-compassion, while showing lower levels of burnout than their non-meditating peers (N=102) when controlling for Social Desirability. Further, the current study found that measures of self-compassion were positively associated with measures of compassion satisfaction (r=0.387, p=0.01) and negatively associated with measures of burnout (r= -0.525, p=0.01) and compassion fatigue (r=-0.452, p=0.01). These results are congruent with the promising research that has been conducted on the relatively new construct of self-compassion, suggesting its utility and value to the growing fields of positive psychology and professional wellness. In addition, post hoc analyses (ANCOVA) revealed that self-care time was found to have a significant impact on compassion satisfaction, suggesting that individuals who practice more than 5 hours of self-care per week have higher levels of compassion satisfaction than their colleagues who reported less self-care time. Limitations included a convenience sample of participants (recruited from state associations and professional list serves) and a fairly stringent definition of meditation practice (at least 60 minutes per week, at least 6 months of practice). Implications for training and practice, which includes the responsibility of training programs to include formal instruction in self-care practices, are presented along with recommendations for future research.
Patricia Parr, PhD (Advisor)
161 p.

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Ringenbach, R. (2009). A Comparison Between Counselors Who Practice Meditation and Those Who Do Not on Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Self-Compassion. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Ringenbach, Ron. "A Comparison Between Counselors Who Practice Meditation and Those Who Do Not on Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Self-Compassion." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Akron, 2009. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 22 Nov 2017.

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Ringenbach, Ron "A Comparison Between Counselors Who Practice Meditation and Those Who Do Not on Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Self-Compassion." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. University of Akron, 2009. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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