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The Academic Performance of Division I Men's College Basketball: Views From Academic Advisors for Athletics
Diehl, Megan L.

2009, Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies /Sport Administration.
This study utilized the sociological imagination to examine the academic performance of Division I men's basketball. Division I men's basketball has consistently fallen behind all other collegiate sports in all academic measures. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the academic performance of Division I male basketball players from the people who work most closely with men's basketball players' academic performance, the academic advisors for athletics. Their insights were used to help understand why basketball teams compile the academic records that they do, what can be done to change that trend, and what kind of impact the new NBA age limit rule will have on the academic performance of college basketball players. Eight academic advisors for athletics were interviewed for this study. Each advisor worked with a men's basketball team that had been in the Associated Press (AP) top 25 during the 2007-2008 season. The academic advisors shared information about their job, general athletics, the academic success of men's basketball, the NBA age-limit rule, solutions to the academic issues with men's basketball, and challenges/traps in the advising career. The advisors proposed many reasons for why men's basketball has the lowest academic records of any collegiate sport. They also expressed their opinions about the NBA age-limit rule and how it has impacted Division I basketball. Many of the issues with the academic performance of men's basketball stems from the culture of the sport. This culture that does not stress academics starts at the youth sports level, and it continues through college. Coaches have a great impact on the culture and the academic performance of their athletes. This culture makes the role of the academic advisor more difficult because it often forces them to work to keep players eligible instead of helping them to get their degree. The culture of men's basketball has to change before any improvement in the academic performance of men's basketball will be seen. This change has to start at the top with the NBA and filter down to youth basketball.
Nancy Spencer, PhD (Committee Chair)
Raymond Schneider, PhD (Committee Member)
Erianne Weight, PhD (Committee Member)
147 p.

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Diehl, M. (2009). The Academic Performance of Division I Men's College Basketball: Views From Academic Advisors for Athletics. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Diehl, Megan. "The Academic Performance of Division I Men's College Basketball: Views From Academic Advisors for Athletics." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2009. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 01 Aug 2015.

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Diehl, Megan "The Academic Performance of Division I Men's College Basketball: Views From Academic Advisors for Athletics." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2009. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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