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Modeling of metal cutting and ball burnishing - prediction of tool wear and surface properties
Yen, Yung-Chang

2004, Doctor of Philosophy, Ohio State University, Industrial and Systems Engineering.
The main theme of the proposed research was centered on a broad scope of surface finishing processes, including conventional finish cutting to ball burnishing. In finish cutting, the effects of edge preparation and tool wear of the cutting tool are considered most critical, as they directly determine surface finish and properties of the subsurface layer (residual stress, microstructure, microhardness). Understanding of tool wear and the capability of predicting it enable successful process optimization. To work towards this goal, the effect of cutting edge designs (hone and chamfer) on the cutting variables and process mechanics was investigated using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations. An FEM-based methodology involving nodal wear rate calculations was developed for uncoated carbide to predict the progression of tool wear geometry during cutting. Cutting inserts with multilayer coatings are used in every category of industrial cutting applications. The analysis of the wear behavior of coated tools largely relies on extensive experimental tests. To supplement reliable process data and reduce the required experimental costs, an FEM simulation model for coated tools was developed by modeling the coating structure as an effective composite layer. The thermal insulation effect of the hard coatings (ex. Al2O3) was evaluated using the model and qualitatively compared with the experimental data in literature. The developed analysis model for coated tools was applied to a selected industrial case in which a comparative study of tool wear was required. The wear characteristics of the 1mm-TiN/9.5mm-Al2O3/4mm-TiCN coated tool against AISI 1080 and 8219 were analyzed through conventional turning experiments. Correspondingly, an approximated 2-D simulation model was developed based on fresh tool geometry. This model predicted the initial wear rate at the start of cutting and allowed differentiation of the tool wear at distinct cutting conditions. Another focus of this research was on the surface enhancement by ball burnishing, which is used following machining to improve surface finish and provide a surface layer of compressive residual stresses. The selection of burnishing pressure, ball diameter, speed, and feed rate needs to be optimized. A full 3-D FEM analysis model and a simplified 2-D model were developed and their predictions of residual stresses were evaluated with limited experimental data. For the 2-D model, the strong elastic recovery of the burnished surface during unloading caused the simulation similar to a series of “indentions”, whereas the 3-D model showed realistic surface deformation and material flow. Furthermore, the effects of the initial plastic strain and residual stresses in the machined surface, as opposed to uniform bulk material, were analyzed. Results showed that they did not have significant effect on the predicted residual stresses after burnishing.
Taylan Altan (Advisor)
282 p.

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Yen, Y. (2004). Modeling of metal cutting and ball burnishing - prediction of tool wear and surface properties. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Yen, Yung-Chang. "Modeling of metal cutting and ball burnishing - prediction of tool wear and surface properties." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2004. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 01 Jul 2015.

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Yen, Yung-Chang "Modeling of metal cutting and ball burnishing - prediction of tool wear and surface properties." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio State University, 2004. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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