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Dismissed yet Disarming: The Portrait Miniature Revival, 1890-1930
Gunderson, Maryann S.

2003, Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Ohio University, Art History (Fine Arts).

The portrait miniature revival is examined regarding contemporary influences and artists, during the period c. 1890-1930. Modern influences, including the philosophies of Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau, are defined in context of the miniature. The fine arts of John Singer Sargent’s portraiture, as well as the abstraction and color of Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas, are revealed as instrumental in altering the style of the revival miniature. Photography is examined for its influence versus eclipse of the miniature. The miniaturist’s environment is found to be highly significant, as the city of New York provided constant immersion in art societies, exhibitions, and studio residences where artists coexisted while creating new styles. Focus is on the works of miniaturists Eulabee Dix and Laura Coombs Hills. Patronage is found to be highly supportive of the portrait miniature and essential to an understanding of why the miniature was revived during the period.

Jody Lamb (Advisor)
112 p.

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Gunderson, M. (2003). Dismissed yet Disarming: The Portrait Miniature Revival, 1890-1930. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Gunderson, Maryann. "Dismissed yet Disarming: The Portrait Miniature Revival, 1890-1930." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio University, 2003. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 04 Jul 2015.

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Gunderson, Maryann "Dismissed yet Disarming: The Portrait Miniature Revival, 1890-1930." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Ohio University, 2003. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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