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Nurses' and elderly patients' decisions regarding physical restraint
Mion, Lorraine Cecilia

1992, Doctor of Philosophy, Case Western Reserve University, Nursing.
This study was a clinical decision analysis evaluating two methods to manage cognitively and physically impaired elderly patients at risk of falling in two settings, nursing home and hospital. The two methods were physical restraint and increased observation accompanied by environmental manipulation. Following the choice of restraint or nonrestraint strategies were the events of strategy complications, falling, fall injury, and hip fracture mortality or morbidity. There were 26 possible health outcomes. Registered nurses and patients 65 years of age or older (n = 252), recruited equally from the nursing home and hospital settings, participated in the study. The participants rank ordered and then rated the 26 outcomes from least to most preferred health state. The "expected value" for each strategy (restraint versus nonrestraint) was obtained by combining the participants' outcome preferences with the likelihood of the outcomes' occurrence. The strategy with the higher expected value was viewed as the "rational" and favored alternative. The participants completed a questionnaire eliciting their opinions regarding use of physical restraint as well as demographic and clinical experience data. It was hypothesized that (a) more nurses than patients, and (b) more hospital than nursing home nurses would f avor the restraint approach. Results from the decision analysis failed to support either hypothesis. Both nurses and patients overwhelmingly chose the nonrestraint approach as the optimal strategy. Only 2(2%) nurses, one from each setting, and three patients (2%), two from the nursing home, favored physical restraint using decision analysis. Twelve (10%) nurses, 6 from each site, stated, however, that restraint was the best strategy to prevent patient falls. This inconsistency between the nurses' rational and global choices was significant (McNemar's χ2 = 5.78, p =.02). Sixty-one (48%) patients believed physical restraint was the best approach to prevent falls. The inconsistency between the patients' rational and global choices was also significant (McNemar's χ2 = 55.15, p <.001). Altering the likelihood of falling or the complications of either approach did not change the participants' rational choice. Rather, the participant's perception of the quality of life of the health outcomes following use of physical restraint as compared to outcomes following nonrestraint was the critical determinant in influencing the optimal choice.
May Wykle (Advisor)
255 p.

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Mion, L. (1992). Nurses' and elderly patients' decisions regarding physical restraint. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Mion, Lorraine. "Nurses' and elderly patients' decisions regarding physical restraint." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Case Western Reserve University, 1992. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 01 Sep 2015.

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Mion, Lorraine "Nurses' and elderly patients' decisions regarding physical restraint." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Case Western Reserve University, 1992. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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