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A Model for Health? An Examination of the Exercise and Nutritional Attitudes and Behaviors of Personal Trainers and Their Influences on the Individuals They Lead
Holcomb, Brett C.

2010, Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies /Developmental Kinesiology.
Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the exercise and eating behaviors of personal trainers and how these variables may be related to the exercise and eating behaviors of their clients. Method: Female personal trainers (n = 17) and female clients (n = 39) were analyzed on dependent variables concerning exercise dependence, eating disordered behaviors, and affect. Specifically, independent-samples t test were conducted comparing personal trainers and clients, high and low exercise dependent personal trainers, clients from high and low exercise dependent personal trainers, and high and low exercise dependent exercisers on the dependent variables. Results: Significant differences for symptoms of exercise dependence were found between personal trainers and clients. Personal trainers scored significantly higher on the EDS-R subscales of Tolerance (p = .003), Reduction in Other Activities (p = .001) and also on the EDS-R total score (p = .008). Differences between personal trainers and clients approached significance for the EAT-26 subscale of Bulimia and Food Preoccupation (p = .060). Significant differences were also found for eating disordered behaviors among the low and high exercise dependent personal trainers. Low exercise dependent personal trainers reported significantly lower scores on the EAT-26 subscale of Dieting (p = .009) and also on the EAT-26 total score (p = .013). Contrary to expectations, no significant differences were found between the clients from low and high exercise dependent personal trainers on exercise dependence, eating disordered behaviors, or affect. Also, no significant differences were found between low and high exercise dependent exercisers on eating disordered behavior or affect. Conclusions: Personal trainers reported higher exercise dependent symptomatology and lower eating disordered behaviors than clients. No differences in affect were found between the two groups. While group differences regarding exercise and eating behaviors between personal trainers and clients were evident, both groups reported scores that were at a low risk for exercise dependence and eating disordered behavior.
David Tobar, PhD (Advisor)
Bonnie Berger, PhD (Committee Member)
Todd Keylock, PhD (Committee Member)
127 p.

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Holcomb, B. (2010). A Model for Health? An Examination of the Exercise and Nutritional Attitudes and Behaviors of Personal Trainers and Their Influences on the Individuals They Lead. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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Holcomb, Brett. "A Model for Health? An Examination of the Exercise and Nutritional Attitudes and Behaviors of Personal Trainers and Their Influences on the Individuals They Lead." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2010. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 27 May 2015.

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Holcomb, Brett "A Model for Health? An Examination of the Exercise and Nutritional Attitudes and Behaviors of Personal Trainers and Their Influences on the Individuals They Lead." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2010. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

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