Search ETDs:
FOREST FRAGMENTATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON ARTHROPOD POPULATIONS IN SMALL VS. LARGE FORESTS IN NORTHWEST OHIO
Baumgardner, Mary C.

2007, Master of Science (MS), Bowling Green State University, Biological Sciences.
The loss of biodiversity is a large challenge facing the conservation biologist. Many species of arthropods are susceptible to displacement, starvation or complete decimation when human activities, such as development, occur within or near their habitat. Insects and arthropods are not valued by the average person and are typically considered to be a frightening nuisance. The value of arthropods cannot be overstated. Arthropods perform services for ecosystems that are needed by plants and other organisms. For example, the elimination of insect pollinators would halt much of plant fruit and seed production and cause a reduction in plant repopulation. Detritivorous insects are vital to plants for their distribution of nutrients into soil. Larger forested areas should contain a greater abundance of arthropods and more species than smaller forests, according to the theory of island biogeography. The theory of island biogeography involves the study of distribution of species and community composition on islands. Various patches of small and large forests suggest islands of different sizes (Smith and Smith 2001). I calculated species richness, arthropod abundance and graphed species to forest area comparisons. My nine study sites varied from 1.6 to 1500 hectares. Most of the sites were surrounded by agricultural areas with roads or highways bordering one or more sides of the forests creating a possible barrier. Some of the larger sites also had roads cutting through the forest. Arthropods were sampled four times at each of the nine study sites in late spring and summer of 2005 and 2006 using the beat-stick method for collection. Once arthropods were placed into a zippered plastic bag with the sample of the tree or shrub and preserved in the freezer until sorting and identification could begin. There was little variation in abundance or species richness; small forests tended to have only slightly higher abundance numbers than the larger forest sites. The only group of insects that showed greater species richness in small vs. large forests was the order Orthoptera (p<0.05). Sorensen’s Similarity Index showed low similarity in study sites. The results of this study could be useful in land management; more studies need to be completed to aid in the total understanding of species distribution, community structure and optimal habitat requirements for arthropods.
Dan Pavuk (Advisor)
71 p.

Recommended Citations

Hide/Show APA Citation

Baumgardner, M. (2007). FOREST FRAGMENTATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON ARTHROPOD POPULATIONS IN SMALL VS. LARGE FORESTS IN NORTHWEST OHIO. (Electronic Thesis or Dissertation). Retrieved from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Hide/Show MLA Citation

Baumgardner, Mary. "FOREST FRAGMENTATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON ARTHROPOD POPULATIONS IN SMALL VS. LARGE FORESTS IN NORTHWEST OHIO." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2007. OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. 27 Mar 2015.

Hide/Show Chicago Citation

Baumgardner, Mary "FOREST FRAGMENTATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON ARTHROPOD POPULATIONS IN SMALL VS. LARGE FORESTS IN NORTHWEST OHIO." Electronic Thesis or Dissertation. Bowling Green State University, 2007. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/

Files

bgsu1174692138.pdf (215.26 KB) View|Download